Sottsass Exhibition at ICA Miami

Wonderful Ettore Sottsass exhibition at the ICA Miami “Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory” which surveys Ettore’s work focusing on his monumental furniture, ceramics, photography and speculative drawings. Very strong, tightly focused exhibition on this maestro. Exhibition closes October 6.

Rietveld Cabinet 2000
Extremely rare door 1960’s
Grey Furniture 1960’s
Grey furniture 1960’s
Memphis 1980’s

Ettore Sottsass at the Triennale Museum

Just returned from trip to Europe and made sure I stopped in Milan to see an amazing exhibition of Ettore Sottsass  called “There is a Planet” at the Triennale Museum which is open thru March 11th. The title of the exhibition is that of a project that Sottsass started in the 1990’s , but never completed. The project was to show photos which he had taken over many years in 5 categories; architecture, houses, doors, people and more in general dwellings which involve the presence of humans on the planet. This forms the structure of this exhibition.

This all encompassing exhibit displayed over 6000 square feet of exhibition space includes many rare early pieces never exhibited to the public in Sottsass’ lifetime. For those of you lucky enough to have seen the exhibit-Congratulations. Those of you who will be in Milan before March 11th, this is a must highlight for any design aficionado.

For anyone not in either in the above categories, I took many photos which I am sharing with you.

 

 

 

Design Miami 2017

The 13th edition of Design Miami (6-10 December) recently concluded. The global creative community descended  on the city, all in the name of design and art. Seeing an energized focus on the expanding Design District this year, CoBo Social invited Al Eiber to share his top picks in Design Miami 2017.

 

Le Corbusier
Les Huit
Tapestry
Robert Four
89 × 117 7/10 × 1 1/5 in
226 × 299 × 3 cm Edition 2/2AP/5+2 AP

Al Eiber’s take on the work: This Le Courbusier tapestry is a rare example designed by one of the most important architects of the 20th century.

 

Joris Laarman
Maker Chair (Voronoi)
2014
Walnut
30 71/100 × 23 31/50 × 25 59/100 in
78 × 60 × 65 cm
Edition of 15

Al Eiber’s take on the work: Joris Laarman is probably the hottest young industrial designer. Currently Joris has a large exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum.

Ettore Sottsass

Kachina 6
2006
Blown glass
19 × 12 1/4 × 9 1/2 in
48.3 × 31.1 × 24.1 cm

Al Eiber’s take on the work: Ettore Sottsass is one of my favorite architects. His glass pieces and his 1960’s ceramics are especially great and collectable.

Kengo Kuma

Urushi Project, Chandelier
2017
31 1/2 × 78 7/10 × 31 1/2 in
80 × 199.9 × 80 cm

Al Eiber’s take on the work: This chandelier by this brilliant Japanese architect is fantastic.

STUDIO 65

“Bocca” Sofa
1973
Red stretched upholstery over polyurethane foam
Gufram
83 × 32 × 36 in
210.8 × 81.3 × 91.4 cm

Al Eiber’s take on the work: The Italian Radical Design work is finally receiving appropriate recognition as a historically important period. Look for pieces designed by Archizoom, Superstudio and Studio 65.

The Haas Brothers
George II
Silverware Hex Display Case
2015
Hex Tile, Walnut
Unique Hex Tile Display Case with Carved Walnut Top with seventy-two slots.
37”L x 30.5”W x 32”H.

The Haas Brothers
George II
Silverware Set
2015
Sterling Silver
Unique sculptural silverware produced in Sterling silver, comprised of six pieces.

 

Al Eiber’s take on the work: The Haas Brothers made this Silverware which they named George II. It is one of the most stunning flatware sets I have ever seen.

 

Fall Auctions under way

Albert Paley Brooch $ 26,250

Gaetano Pesce-4 Nobody’s Perfect Chairs $ 8,125

Ettore Sottsass Carlton Bookcase $ 26,250

George Nakashima Table Lamp $ 18,500

David Rago Auctions had a series of sales this past weekend including a single owner sale of Mark McDonald and a very strong sale of Modern Design. Prices remain strong and most lots did well. Check out ragoauctions.com/auctions website for the many lots including great furniture, glass, and ceramics offered.

 

Marc Benda

DESIGN

Marc Benda: A Lifelong Passion for Design

By  | 

OVER THE LAST DECADE, MARC BENDA has established himself as a discerning and deeply intelligent force in the world of contemporary design. In 2007 he joined with Barry Friedman, since retired, to open their eponymous gallery in Chelsea. This past May, an exhibition entitled dna10 looked back to the gallery’s beginnings to honor its tenth anniversary in a show that featured the work of twenty-one artists and designers from five continents—showing both historic modern objects and contemporary work and demonstrating Friedman Benda’s wide scope. In this interview, MODERN contributing editor Al Eiber speaks with Benda about his upbringing, his passion for design, and his curatorial eye.

AE: You are celebrating your tenth anniversary. Can you discuss the recent exhibition that commemorated this significant moment in the gallery’s history?

MB: Normally, our shows are monographic and developed over months, more often years, with a single designer and his or her studio. Once a year we invite an outside curator who brings a fresh vision in design to the gallery. This one time, I wanted to prepare an exhibition that is both personal and satisfies my desire to lay out our vision, to show what has been driving us to keep pushing boundaries. Perhaps we will fail and the show will end up being too chaotic, but it will have been a fun process.

Ettore Sottsass 1955–1969, installation at Friedman Benda, September 10– October 17, 2015. Friedman Benda and the Ettore Sottsass Studio/Adam Reich Photo

AE: Let’s go back to the beginning, how did you get into the business?

MB: It happened so naturally that I cannot put a real start date to it. My parents were passionate collectors of decorative arts for many years. We spent many holidays and weekends going to flea markets and brocante, or bric-a-brac, shops that used to dot the French landscape. In those days you could find many good objects almost anywhere in Europe. My parents engaged with dealers to learn about the material they were coveting. The hunt for the objects was very exciting to me from a young age, and I was a collector at heart. From post stamps to vintage Disney toys and soccer stickers, I caught the bug early on and I have not yet found a cure.

After I graduated from high school, my mother started a gallery operating out of a warehouse in Zurich. I was living in Paris for a few months and would scour the flea markets and Left Bank galleries every weekend to find objects for her to sell. In the following few years, I became very passionate about Murano glass and started building a network of dealers and some buyers. It was in those years that I met Barry Friedman, too. He took me under his wing and simultaneously gave me the space to grow and beat my own path.

AE: I know you speak multiple languages. How many?

MB: I am able to converse in four, though I don’t have a very good accent when speaking any of them.

AE: Why did you decide to open in New York and not in Europe?

MB: When I was twenty, I visited a friend in New York, visiting by myself for the first time (and second time overall). It was such a revelation, the energy, the sheer power pulsing through the streets of this city. I wanted to live here and build my life here. New York is the place where you can do what I set out to do.

Joris Laarman’s Soft Gradient Chair (Dual Cell), 2014, from his Microstructures series, is constructed of thermoplastic polyurethane, a 3-D printed material. Friedman Benda and Joris Laarman/Adam Reich Photo

AE: How do you find your talent? How do you evaluate whether to represent a talented industrial designer?

MB: Usually our relationships grow over extended periods. I keep a dialogue with many designers and artists, sometimes over years, before we decide to collaborate. Finding the right match is very important, and usually that is based on personality as much as on the nature of the work. You want this to become a true partnership, something with room to grow and evolve over the years. As in life and in love, working relationships require understanding, patience, nurturing, and a mutual commitment.

AE: What’s more fun, working with current design or working with historical pieces?

MB: I grew up looking for historical works, and loved the hunt, the research, the excitement when something bought on a hunch turned out to be better than expected. We have handled some very important works over the years, many of which are now in museums. Sometimes you follow an object for years before it is yours.

Working with a living designer can be even more exciting, though: there are projects that take years to come to fruition. You may first see a sketch or a model for something new, have the germ of an idea explained in a conversation. Following the sometimes many and excruciating steps of a project to completion can cost you some gray hairs or make you question your sanity. However, when you stand in the room with the finished piece you only remember the beautiful parts. It is as if we constantly give birth to beautiful babies, and always forget the diaper changes and sleepless nights.

Nendo’s Cabbage chairs, handcrafted from folded paper rolls used in Issey Miyake’s pleat-making process, on view in nendo: Ghost Stories, an installation on view February 27–April 11, 2009. Friedman Benda and nendo/Jimmy Cohrssen Photo

AE: If you had $1,000 to buy a design piece, what would you recommend? What if you had $100,000?

MB: I love design, and I love smart design. Often, smart objects don’t need to be very expensive. I am perhaps the wrong person to ask this question, as I value the objects I covet more highly than the money I need to spend (and first earn) to buy them. With $1,000 I would probably go for a nice piece of iconic American design. There are so many great design pieces available from eBay and countless vintage shops across the country. Objects that tell a story, have a place in history, that are relevant in their context, and have a beautiful presence in your life.

With $100,000, that is a different story. I would allocate $1,000 to buy books first. Another $4,000 to fly around and visit museums, dealers and see exhibitions, talk to people. Learn. With the remaining $95,000 I would buy the best object I could find. I would not buy a hundred things, I would buy that one object I could not live without. It would be the best piece I could ever buy.

Sottsass Glass Exhibition

The next segment of the exhibition series Le Stanze del Vetro is on at the Fondazione Cini in Venice from the 10th April to the 30th July 2017. It is an exhibition of  Ettore Sottsass glass. Overseen by Luca Massimo Barbero (director of the Institute of Art History at the Fondazione Giorgio Cini), Ettore Sottsass: il vetro is the centennial celebration of the birth of this iconic Italian architect.

The exhibition display by Annabelle Selldorf has over 200 different pieces, all designed between 1947 and 2007. A wide selection comes from the Ernest Mourmans collection and some are exhibited for the first time in history, exactly like the sculptures which flank the staircase, made in 1999 for Qatar Sheikh Saud bin Muhammad Al Thani. One-off pieces and real works of art in glass and crystal, made for some of the most important glass manufacturers in Italy and around the world. There’re collections for Vistosi, sculptures by Toso Vetri d’Arte, iconic lamps designed in the eighties for Venini, as well as pieces made for experimental glass workshop Cirva di Marsiglia, namely just some of the brands which can claim to have worked with Ettore. And obviously, this exhibition couldn’t be complete without designs for top brands like Baccarat, Alessi, Egizia, Fontanarte, Swarovksi and Serafino Zani for whom Ettore experimented in cut glass.

Without a doubt, Ettore Sottsass: il vetro is a really unique experience (the first time an exhibition focuses entirely on Ettore Sottsass’ glass designs). Ettore’s glass designs “are more like real characters”, in fact like exhibition curator Luca Massimo Barbero points out  “they are about the real world as much as an imaginary one”. Plus, glass skilfully moulded with other materials like plastics or polycarbonate turns into art which looks to the future.

 

Where: Fondazione Cini, Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice, Italy

When: 10 April – 30 July 2017